The Best Cross Country Spikes in 2018

When it comes to cross-country shoes, investing in the right pair is essential. Although runners have a personal preference depending on the type of course, your cross country spikes need to be durable and lightweight with great traction to get you across the finish line as fast as possible.

If you’ve never worn cross-country spikes before, you’ll likely be surprised the first time you try them on that they aren’t very comfortable – especially compared to a good pair of trainers. But don’t worry, in the middle of a meet you won’t notice them until you are powering around a corners or up a steep hill!

One thing you’ll notice about the fit is that XC spikes are cut very narrow like a track spike. This is because you want them tight, almost like an extension of your foot. You also want less room around your toes than your trainers. Look for about half a thumb-width between your toes and the front of the spike. Your feet should feel snug but not cramped.

Because they are cut so narrow, if you have wide feet, it can be tough to find a good fit. We recommend the Altra Golden Spike if you find regular spikes aren’t wide enough. This is one of the few wide XC spikes available today.

Now it’s time to get the best pair of XC spikes. We’ve put together this list of the best of the best cross country spikes to help you pick the one that’s right for you.


Top 3 Best and Favorites

Best for Wide Feet

Altra Golden Spike


New Balance XC5Kv4

 

This superior cross country spike delivers the speed, aggression and attitude you need for the ultimate racing experience. At the top of the three-tiered selection of cross-country spikes that New Balance offers, the XC5Kv4 adds visual appeal and performance to your game.

The lightweight breathable support of the XC5Kv4 gives you an enhanced fit and maximum responsiveness without sacrificing stability. Featuring an air mesh Fantom Fit no-sew upper, your feet feel alive and free, allowing you to deliver an energetic performance at your next meet.

Dedicated to helping athletes accomplish their goals, New Balance is driven to make quality shoes for the same reason you lace them up: to achieve the very best. The XC5Kv4 is no exception.

The REVlite midsole and 5-spike formation provide a nimble feel with the protection your feet need. With a true-to-size fit, these spikes are colorful and comfortable. Delivering exceptional performance all around, you’ll find these shoes are especially designed for cross-country or long-distance track running.


PROS:

  • Premium design
  • Best for grass, mud, dirt
  • Support across flat surfaces to rugged trails
  • Fantom fit no-sew upper
  • REVlite midsole

CONS:

  • Expensive

Saucony Carrera XC 3

 

The gorgeous Saucony Carrera XC 3 is sure to provide extra speed and support for your fastest race yet. Featuring a 6-pin spike plate, the Carrera delivers superior traction while maintaining its super lightweight design.
 
ISOFIT technology in the upper creates a dynamic fit that wraps around your foot. It’s designed to adapt to your unique fit. This provides a secure, but comfortable fit. The engineered mesh helps to reduce weight while keeping your feet cool and comfortable.
 
The stiff spike plate in Carrera XC 3 provides excellent toe-off power on a variety of terrains. Combined with the 6-pin spikes, you’ll power around corners and up steep hills.
 
Delivering superior performance, you’ll love this ultra-lightweight shoe. It creates a powerful running experience in many types of racing terrain.

PROS:

  • 6-pin Pebax spike plate
  • ISOFIT dynamic fit system
  • Extremely lightweight design
  • Good tread for grass, dirt, and trails

CONS:

  • Sizing runs small
  • Expensive

New Balance XC900v4

 

The New Balance XC900v4 combines lightweight design with aggressive traction. While it’s a tad heavier than the XC5Kv4, this spike is still one of the top XC spikes available today. It’s a great option for runners who want a great spike without the high cost of the elite XC shoes.
 
The XC900v4s lugged outer sole features REVlite technology for traction in various conditions. This allows for aggressive running in wet or dry terrain.
Spikes can be left in or removed, depending on the course at your meet. Left in, the 6-pin spikes allow for superior traction. Take them out for courses featuring more concrete and pavement.
 
The upper on this cross-country spike creates a custom fit. The track-inspired mesh provides breathability for increased airflow. This bootie around the ankle keeps the shoe light and helps to keep dirt out.
 
The New Balance XC900v4 delivers a snug fit that adapts as it moves with you. It’s lightweight with a stiff spike plate for unrivaled traction.

PROS:

  • HydroHesion rubber for advanced grip in wet weather
  • Track-inspired tongue and upper construction
  • REVlite midsole

CONS:

  • Great value for a top spike but may still be too expensive for new XC athletes

Saucony Havok XC 2

 

Saucony’s Havok XC 2 spikes deliver a locked-down fit combined with a lightweight design. The midsole offers fast, responsive cushioning. And the carbon rubber outsole provides strong traction.
 
Like New Balance’s XC900v4, the Havok XC 2 rides the line between elite spike and a great price. It offers the performance of a top spike but at a nice value. It’s perfect for runners who want more performance than a beginner spike.
 
The breathable upper in this cross-country spike keeps you dry and comfortable on race day. Strong, lightweight Flexfilm on the upper allows for durability and a flexible feel.
 
While it doesn’t have Saucony’s ISOFIT lacing like the Carrera – it will still keep your foot locked-in and secure.
 
Although this spike is best for top 7 and varsity runners, all levels of athletes will appreciate the Havok XC 2’s durability, performance, and reasonable price.

PROS:

  • 6-pin Pebax spike for traction
  • Designed for aggressive grass, trail, and gravel terrain
  • Improved traction
  • Flexfilm upper creates a flexible feel

CONS:

  • Laces are unnecessarily long
  • No ISOFIT lacing

Saucony Kilkenny XC7

 

The Saucony Kilkenny XC has been an integral part of all levels of XC meets for years. It’s by far the most popular beginner XC spike around.
 
The latest version of the Kilkenny features a lightweight upper and a molded midsole for a comfortable fit.
 
The aggressive rubber outsole has a 4-pin spike design for the ultimate in traction on dirt and grass. The outsole has an aggressive tread for added grip with or without the removable spikes.
 
The new soft mesh upper delivers added style and much-needed breathability. The seamless fit of the upper hugs your foot allowing for a secure fit.
 
The Saucony Kilkenny XC is comfortable spike and comes at an affordable price. It’s a great option for new XC athletes thanks to a midsole that’s more cushioned than high-end spikes.
 
The Kilkenny comes in spiked and flat (spikeless) models. Younger runners may opt for the flat version in races where spiked shoes aren’t allowed.

PROS:

  • Comfortable fit
  • Lightweight, seamless upper
  • Affordable price
  • Available in spiked and spikeless

CONS:

  • Heavier and bulkier than more advanced models
  • Designed for beginner runners (actually a PRO, if you are new to XC)
  • Less form-fitting around the foot

New Balance XC Seven

 

This stellar cross-country shoe helps you prepare to tackle your next meet in style. The New Balance XC Seven is full of performance-enhancing at an affordable price.
 
The 6-spike rubber outsole allows for enhanced traction in even the worst racing conditions. Exposed rubber lugs provide an extra level of traction on a variety of terrain.
 
The re-engineered upper contains a hidden internal support cage. This provides a tight fit designed to give beginning runners the edge they need.
 
Like the Kilkenny, the XC Seven is best for new XC athletes. Its cushioned midsole and comfortable fit bridge the gap between trainers and top level spikes.
 
It comes in spike and flat (spikeless) versions. With its comfy fit and affordable price, the XC700 is another great option for runners new to cross-country.

PROS:

  • Extra exposed rubber lugs for more grip
  • Snug fit with flexibility for performance
  • Internal support cage
  • Lightweight, breathable design

CONS:

  • Entry level shoe (only a CON for experienced XC athletes)
  • May not fit as snug

Nike Zoom Rival XC

The sturdy cushioning and lightweight outsole of the Nike Zoom Rival XC means it was made for cross-country running. Featuring a Pebax plate with a 6-spike design for increased traction, you’ll find the perfect balance of fit, traction, and comfort. It’s our top choice for a Nike XC spike.

Thanks to the dynamic arch band, this cross-country spike offers a secure fit. The combined Flywire technology with the carbon fiber midfoot gives added structure and stability to toe off on each stride in multiple types of terrain.

Don’t worry about comfort when it comes to the Nike Zoom Rival XC. Between the breathable mesh construction and the lightweight, responsive cushioning of the midsole, you’re given maximum airflow and flexibility to increase comfort and capability.

Featuring a Nike Anti-Clog traction outsole to help prevent mud and rocks from clogging up your performance, you’ll push past the competition to the finish line.


PROS:

  • Anti-Clog traction for maximum grip
  • A dynamic arch band for a secure fit
  • Lightweight design

CONS:

  • Size runs big for loose fit
  • Thin bottom sole

Altra Golden Spike

With its unique footshaped design, the Altra Golden Spike is a unique racing option for athletes who want to run with natural form. The Golden Spike features a wide toe box to mirror running barefoot. This also makes it a great option for runners with wide feet who want XC spikes.
 
Like Altra’s other shoes, the Golden Spike has a foot-shaped toe box to allow your toes to splay. The zero drop design keeps your feet flat, as if you were running barefoot.
 
Because of the wide toe box, it’s also THE best option for runners with a wider foot.
 
But even though the Golden Spike allows for a natural running stride. It offers great traction and added protection from running on dirt and trails.
 
Featuring a 5-pin spike plate, you’ll find stability and grip on a variety of racing surfaces. The breathable and lightweight upper provides support for a secure, locked-in fit.
 
While the funky look of the Golden Spike might turn off some runners, it’s still a great option for runners who want a natural feel. And again – we can’t state this enough – it’s the best option for runners who need a wide shoe. No other spike on the market comes in wide sizing.

PROS:

  • Secure, sock-like fit
  • Best option for runners with wide feet
  • 5-pin spike plate
  • Foot-shaped toe box for natural splay

CONS:

  • Sizing runs half-size large
  • Funky look

Brooks Mach 18

 

The lightweight Brooks Mach 18 combines an aggressive spike plate with a molded upper for a super-fast XC shoe. The compression-molded EVA midsole provides nice cushioning among the otherwise minimal spikes.

The new and improved sock-like design provides a secure, but comfortable fit. The breathable mesh upper features enhanced microfiber for better internal support and a snug fit.
Experience greater traction and grip through the aggressive lug pattern combined with the 6-plate spike pins. The plastic outsole provides excellent traction on dirt, grass, and composite tracks. Our one complaint is the plastic doesn’t provide great traction on pavement.

PROS:

  • Aggressive lug pattern for traction on dirt and grass
  • Seamless upper cools and secures your feet

CONS:

  • Spikes don’t perform on hard surfaces due to plastic spike plate

 

FAQs

Are cross country spikes the same as track spikes?

No. There are a couple major differences between track spikes and cross country spikes. While both have spike implements that screw into the bottom of the shoe, the differences stop there.

Track spikes have plastic-bottom outer soles (also known as the spike plate). In contrast, cross country spikes have more rubber for some added cushioning.

There is also an emphasis on weight reduction on track spikes. While cross country spikes are light, they are nowhere near as light as track spikes.

Track spikes come in different versions depending on event. There are spikes for sprinting, spikes for middle distances, and spikes for the mile or longer events.

Sprint spikes have an aggressive spike plate and are very stiff. Long distance spikes are light but have minimal cushioning and a thin upper. Middle distance spikes are a tad stiffer with a bit more cushioning.

There is one basic style of cross country spike. They have a more cushioned outer sole with added traction for better grip on dirt and grass. The upper is more substantial than a track spike. This allows them to better to withstand dirt, rocks, and sticks encountered during a meet.

When to wear cross country spikes?

Most runners only wear cross country spikes for meets. You may want to practice in them if you haven’t worn them before. But otherwise only wear them during meets. Use a good pair of trainers for practice.

How much do cross country spikes help?

Quite a bit.

They help in two ways:

The first benefit comes from added traction from the spike implements themselves. These, plus the rubber traction built into the shoes, help you power through turns on grass and dirt. The extra traction is also a huge benefit when running up steep grass and dirt hills.

Second, the lighter weight of the spikes provide a boost when you run. Some of this may be a mental trick. But you’ll feel like you run much faster with a lighter shoe compared to your regular trainers.

How much faster will cross country spikes make you?

They won’t necessarily make you run faster…. but they will keep you from running slower.

You’ll experience this most around turns and corners. The extra traction means you don’t need to slow down as you approach a turn. You’re less likely to slip or slide.

The same traction benefits you on steep hills. You won’t slip, gaining time when you might otherwise be sliding backwards.
The light weight of a spike – as we discussed – may make you run faster. Or it might just make you feel like you can run faster.

Either way, the mental edge can help you power through the last kilometer of a race.

How much are cross country spikes?

Cross country spikes range in price from $60 to $200.

Cross country spikes function the same. Different prices come from the weight and comfort of the spike. Lighter, more minimal spikes cost more than heavier, beginner spikes.

High-end spikes might also feature an enhanced upper with bootie-designed heel collars. These can help keep out debris from getting inside the spike. But they are more for fashion than function.

The most expensive spikes may not be the best spike for you. If you are new to cross country, the entry-level spikes are more cushioned and fit comfortably. Top end spikes are much lighter, but not as pleasant to wear.

Beginner spikes do a better job at bridging the gap between a spike and a good trainer. They’ll give you an advantage over trainers during meets. But without the discomfort of a high-end spike.

How should cross country spikes fit?

Cross country spikes should fit snug. They should feel like an extension of your feet. They’ll feel narrow because they need to wrap securely around your feet when you run. The narrow last also helps cut down on weight.

When fitting spikes, wear them tight. Your feet shouldn’t feel cramped at your toes. But there shouldn’t be a lot of space between your toes and the front of shoe. A good rule of thumb is to wear spikes that are a half size smaller than your trainers.

How long do cross country spikes last?

You should get several seasons out of your spikes before they begin to fall apart.

For most athletes in high school, you’ll grow out of your spikes before you wear them out.

If you are a track athlete and use your XC spikes for track meets, they may wear out a little sooner. But even with the extra use, they should last 3-4 seasons.

How to remove cross country spikes?

The actual spikes implements can be removed with the included spike wrench that come with all spikes. They screw in and out like a threaded screwed.

If a spike gets bent or stuck in the spike, you might need to use a pair of pliers and some elbow grease to remove the stubborn spike. You can spray them first with WD-50 if they are a bit rusty.

How  many spikes do cross country shoes have? Cross country spikes have 4-6 spike implements per shoe. Most beginner spikes have 4 spikes while high end spikes have 5-6. More spikes means more traction.

Why do beginner spike shoes only have 4 spikes?

No real reason other than a way to separate beginner spikes from expensive spikes.

How long are cross country spikes?

Spikes that come included in most shoes are usually 1/4 inch long. These can be removed and replaced with any length. 3/8 inch spikes are a good option for meets with lots of dirt and grass – or meets in wet conditions.

How to clean cross country spikes?

The best thing to do is clean off all the mud and dirt with a brush. An old toothbrush works well for tight areas in the spike threads.
If your spikes are really dirty, let them soak in warm, soapy water – then use a brush to clean them off further. Let them air dry, outside if possible.

A few things you should NOT do:

  • Don’t put them in a washing machine
  • Don’t put them in a dryer

This can cause the spikes to shrink and can damage the spike threads. They can also break down faster with the wear and tear they experience in the washing machine.

Can cross country spikes be used for track?

Yes, they can. But XC spikes function better for long distance events than shorter events. The biggest difference between a long distance spike and a XC spike is weight.

Distance spikes are insanely light with minimal cushioning. XC spikes are more robust and heavier.

You can use XC spikes for other track events. But if you are serious about track and field, you’ll be better off buying a spike made for your specific events.

Can you use cross country spikes for sprinting?

It’s generally not recommended. If you are dabbling with sprinting, XC spikes are better than trainers.But a sprint spike has a stiff and aggressive spike plate. They are designed so you can run on your toes. XC spikes lack the traction and are too flexible to function well for sprinting events.