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Best Running Shoes for Neuropathy in 2021

 

Neuropathy is a debilitating condition that causes pain and numbness, often in your feet. That’s why wearing the correct footwear is a must! And even if you aren’t a runner, running shoes are often your best option to help ease neuropathy pain in your feet.

Our top choice is the Hoka One One Bondi 7. This plush, cushioned shoe offers plenty of support for your feet. But it is expensive, and has a funky design that may turn some non-funky people off. So we’ve found a wide range of other options with different styles and price points.

Read on to see which ones we think are the best…

Top 4 Best and Favorites

 

Hoka One One Bondi 7

 

  • Phenomenal cushioning
  • Wide toe box
  • Highly-supportive
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Altra Viho

 

  • Great breathability
  • Attractive design
  • High-quality
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Hoka One One Gaviota 2

 

  • Lots of cushioning
  • Nice ventilation
  • Comfortable
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Altra Paradigm 5

 

  • Roomy toe box
  • Well-balanced
  • Comfortable and supportive
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Best Overall

1. Hoka One One Bondi 7

Sweeping the rankings is Hoka One One’s Bondi 7. It is extremely well-cushioned, with a plush feel throughout the entire shoe. Comfort is critical if you suffer from neuropathy. And that’s where the Bondi 7 shines.

On top of the max cushioning, the Bondi provides support and stability. Its wide platform is ideal for keeping your feet in a neutral position while you run and walk.

The Bondi is fairly lightweight for a shoe with this much cushioning. An improved outsole made of durable rubber fixes the longevity issues found in earlier models. These shoes are comfortable on and off-road, though their high stack height means some people may want to stick to smooth surfaces.

The improved EVA midsole is unique in two key ways. First, it’s thick, which is where the cushioning comes in. Second, the shoe has a rocker-design, rocking you from your heels to your toes. It takes a little getting used to, but this does help provide a smooth gait as you walk and run.

Bondis are fairly wide, with a roomy toe box. This helps to deal with the pain from neuropathy. If you need an even wider shoe, it does come in wide widths.

And as you can tell from the picture, it is a funky-looking shoe. You ride tall in this shoe from its thick sole.

There’s a lot to like here. But you’re going to pay for it. The Bondi 7 is a pricey running shoe. But for the cushioning and pain-relief, we think they are worth it.


PROS:

  • Phenomenal cushioning
  • Wide toe box
  • Highly-supportive
  • Reduces pain

CONS:

  • Expensive
  • Funky look

Best Value

 

2. Altra Viho

Have you been looking for a lightweight running shoe that’s made of premium materials but comes at an affordable price? Altra nailed it with the Viho. It’s an incredibly light shoe with a comfortable, roomy toe box.

The upper consists of a multi-directional mesh. This results in a flexible, versatile, and feathery-light running shoe. It’s highly breathable, which helps keep your feet cool.

At just a little over 9 ounces, running feels natural. The InnerFlex midsole plays a big role in providing you with balance and control.

The outsole uses Altra’sFootPod rubber, giving you support, traction, and flexibility. The flex grooves are designed to contour to the shape of your foot to aid in a natural running motion.

The cushioning is admittedly not as plush as some of the other shoes we review. But it’s adequate enough, especially at this price point.

Like all of Altra’s shoes, these are zero-drop, meaning the heel and toe are the same height. Most running shoes raise the heel. This can take some getting used to if you normally wear traditional running shoes.

It’s important to add that some runners had to go with a bigger size than what they typically wear.


PROS:

  • Great breathability
  • Attractive design
  • High-quality
  • Affordable

CONS:

  • Too small for some runners

Most Cushioned Shoe for Neuropathy

 

3. Hoka One One Gaviota 2

Hoka One One makes the grade again, this time with the Gaviota 2. These shoes are just as cushioned as the Bondi, but add extra stability for runners and walkers who overpronate.

Those with neuropathy will appreciate the support offered by the Gaviota 2. The moment you step inside, you can tell there’s a difference.

Like the Bondi, this is a max-cushioned shoe that feels plush and soft. Because of this, your pain is instantly reduced.

The mesh upper plays a big role in this comfort as well. It’s supportive yet well-vented. It cools your feet while running and walking.

The EVA midsole is an excellent addition that helps absorb shocks, bumps, and jolts. This makes all the difference in taking the impact through the shoe and not your spine.

Runners will also love the sole on the Gaviota 2. It sports a great textured design pattern that offers enhanced grip and traction.

Like many Hoka models, the Gaviota is fairly expensive. That being said, it has a lot to offer, especially to those in pain.


PROS:

  • Lots of cushioning
  • Nice ventilation
  • Comfortable
  • Attractive

CONS:

  • Expensive

Widest Toe Box Shoes for Neuropathy

4. Altra Paradigm 5

Any time we make a list of shoes that give your feet plenty of space, Altra grabs at least a couple spots. If you need a highly cushioned, supportive, and wide toe box shoe, Altra has the perfect solution with the Paradigm 5.

Altra’s StabiliPod technology, combined with their guide rail system, works to keep your feet supported with added stability. If you want the cushioning and support of the Gaviota combined with a wide toebox, the Paradigm is your best choice.

The Ego foam in the midsole provides a soft, cushioned ride with responsiveness and some energy return. Overall, it makes for a comfortable shoe.

The Paradigm also features a unique Fit4Her design that features changes in the women’s model that are unique to female feet. Ultimately, this produces a more comfortable shoe for most women.

One of the complaints about the Paradigm is its weight. It is indeed a pretty hefty shoe. But that’s common with most cushioned shoes, and a trade-off you have to make.

You might want to order the next size up, though, as the Paradigms tend to run a bit on the small side.


PROS:

  • Roomy toe box
  • Well-balanced
  • Comfortable
  • Supportive

CONS:

  • Sizes run small
  • Fairly heavy

Best for Wide Feet

5. New Balance Fresh Foam More v2

New Balance makes its first appearance with their Fresh Foam More v2. This is a well-structured running shoe known for its ability to accommodate wide feet.

Similar to the Paradigms above, the More v2 is quite spacious in the upper, great for wide feet.

It’s surprisingly lightweight. And big. Yes, this is a rather beefy shoe. There’s a lot going on here, but for good reason.

The width is the first thing you notice about the More v2. It really stands out, as the toe box is obviously bigger than ‘normal’ shoes. Looks aside, those with wide feet will feel right at home.

The mesh upper provides plenty of breathability. And the wide toe box helps offset with more airflow. New Balance’s Fresh Foam midsole is flexible, yet quite stable.

This shoe is ideal if you have wide feet. New Balance offers sizes ranging from 7 to 16 in men’s, while women can choose from 5 to 13. Wide and extra-wide versions are available.

It’s worth noting that these are some expensive running shoes. That said, we feel like they are worth it if you have wide feet.


PROS:

  • Great for wide feet
  • Incredible room
  • Plenty of sizes
  • Comfortable

CONS:

  • Expensive

Top Walking Shoes for Neuropathy

 

6. Saucony Echelon 8

The Saucony Echelon is a cushioned, stable shoe with a roomy upper. It has a wide toe box and the overall fit is very comfortable.

While the Echelon is marketed as a running shoe, its stable base and cushioned ride also makes it perfect for walking.

The Echelon’s spacious toe box makes the shoe comfortable. With the large upper, the shoe can easily take an orthotic – even a chunky custom – quite well.

Breathability isn’t quite as good as some other running shoes. But when you’re walking, you don’t really notice it.

The shoe is fairly thick in the midsole, but this is due to the amount of cushioning it has. It also has what’s called a straight last. This means the shoe doesn’t curve in quite as much as typically running shoes. It makes the fit wider and also adds extra stability to the shoe.


PROS:

  • Stable walking shoe
  • Comfortable fit
  • Can fit an orthotic

CONS:

  • Not aesthetically pleasing

Best for Pavement and Concrete

7. Topo Ultrafly 3

Topo’s Ultrafly 3 has a foot-shaped design that allows for a wide toe box in the front of the shoe. This shoe offers moderate stability that balances nicely with its soft midsole.

Speaking of the midsole, it’s a combination of firm, responsive, and durable foam. It feels soft against your feet but has enough firmness underneath to provide support.

Topo’s Zip Foam, also built into the midsole, helps to absorb bumps and shocks that would otherwise be felt in your legs and back.

Also unique is the 5mm drop of the shoe. Most foot-shaped running shoes have a zero drop, meaning your heel and toe are the same height. Lower drops take some getting used to for most people. But the slightly raised heel in the Ultrafly means it doesn’t feel as comfortable when walking and running.

The Ultrafly 3 is a relatively lightweight shoe. A pair is moderately priced, although a bit on the high side.

But considering their high durability and long-lasting materials, we feel it’s a good value.


PROS:

  • High durability
  • Reduced pain
  • Lightweight
  • Attractive

CONS:

  • Fairly pricey shoe

Best Stability Shoes for Neuropathy

 

8. Saucony Hurricane 22

Saucony’s Hurricane 22 is known for its stability and plush, cushioned ride.

From first step-in feel to running on the road, this is a soft running shoe. It’s not super-flexible, but that helps it stay supportive.

The FORMFIT upper provides a customized fit when tightening the laces. The outer sole is grippy rubber for good traction.

Saucony worked to eliminate any unnecessary weight in this model. They’re still a tad on the heavy side, but not as much as previous versions.

If you want a cushioned and plush running shoe with extra support and stability, the Hurricane is a great option.


PROS:

  • Excellent stability
  • Well-cushioned
  • Attractive

CONS:

  • Expensive
  • Fairly heavy

Best Lightweight Shoes for Neuropathy

9. Hoka One One Clifton 7

At just 9 ounces, the Clifton 7 is a lightweight shoe with tons of cushioning. Most running shoes get heavy as more cushioning is added – but the Clifton bucks that trend with a soft, plush, but airy shoe.

The upper is soft, but also sturdy. Whereas the Bondi is Hoka’s flagship road shoe, the Clifton is their flagship trail shoe. It’s the perfect balance of comfort, stability, and traction. It breathes really well, providing good ventilation.

A gentle rocking design is built into the shoe, helping to provide a smooth gait as you run. It takes some getting used to, but the rocking combined with the cushioning is ideal.

Some past versions of the Clifton have had durability issues, but Hoka seems to have solved the issue with this shoe.


PROS:

  • Nice cushioning
  • Lightweight design
  • Fairly wide toe box
  • Attractive

CONS:

  • Pricey

Top Cheap Shoes for Neuropathy

10. Hoka One One Rincon

Like the Clifton, Hoka’s Rincon 2 is another lightweight but well-cushioned running shoe.

The difference is that the Rincon is significantly cheaper than the Cliftons. While it’s not quite as soft and plush as the Cliftons, the Rincon 2 still offers Hoka’s unique cushioning and design.

They sport an EVA midsole that gives you a bouncy step with lots of rebound. Whether you’re walking or running, the Rincon delivers excellent responsiveness.

The upper is thin and meshy – great for breathability, although it’s not quite as supportive as other Hokas.


PROS:

  • Lightweight design
  • Nice cushioning
  • Responsive
  • Affordable

CONS:

  • Might be too wide for some runners

 

FAQs

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that can be quite debilitating. It’s caused by damage to your peripheral nerves that results in numbness and weakness in your body. It seems to affect the extremities most often, making it difficult to perform even the simplest of tasks.

What Triggers Neuropathy?

Those with diabetes are known to develop neuropathy more so than most others. But it can also be brought on by traumatic injury.

There are many factors that can enhance the symptoms of neuropathy. The most common include excessive drinking of alcohol, vitamin deficiencies, and liver disease. But there are certain cancers or poisons that can cause neuropathy, as well.

How Should Runners Treat Neuropathy?

It’s important to keep yourself well-conditioned. Running without properly preparing the body can result in neuropathy flare-ups. Don’t overdo it. Begin with a slow, low-impact workout routine. Pace yourself while keeping your regimen light and easy.

Buyer’s Guide for Neuropathy Shoes

Toe Box

One of the best things you can do for your feet is to invest in a pair of shoes that have a wide toe box. You want your toes to have plenty of room for movement. This will make running far less taxing on the body.

Cushioning

The second-best factor of running shoes is to get a pair with lots of cushioning. You likely noticed from the reviews that most of the entries excelled at this. It’s important for those with neuropathy to have ample support around your feet.

This goes a long way in ensuring that your feet don’t take the full brunt of your movement. Invest in a pair of shoes that are designed to do that for you.

Buy the Correct Size

If you find a pair of shoes you like that don’t have enough room in the toe box, try moving up half a size. This will often provide the space your toes require to move freely inside the shoe.

If you have wide feet anyway, it may benefit you to increase by a full size. Many runners find that this makes a big difference in improving their overall comfort.

The Wired Runner